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Frequently Asked Questions


CS 60 - Introduction to C, C++, and Unix (Spring 2005)



Thu Apr 28 00:51:39 PDT 2005

Do we need to learn/use Emacs?

Two points: (1) Emacs is a good and very useful tool for computer scientists to know, even if it is not your main editing tool. You may well be in environments in the future (e.g., a job) where using Emacs is necessary. So it's definitely worth learning, and CS60 is your opportunity to do so. However, it's not our intent to force you to solely, or even primarily, use Emacs. (2) As has been stated in class (and in the syllabus), you are responsible for everything that is covered in class and in the discussion sessions, and since Emacs is one of those things, it's certainly fair game for the final exam.

(But hopefully #1 is a stronger motivation than #2.)


Posted by Matthew Turk | Permalink | Categories: Class, General

Thu Mar 31 17:29:40 PST 2005

After I compile my program, I type 'a.out', but I only get an error message. How can I run/execute my program?

To run your program you must explicitly provide the path to your executable file. This means that if you are trying to run your executable a.out, and a.out is in your current working directory, you must type `./a.out` to execute the program.

Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: C, Linux

Thu Mar 31 17:26:08 PST 2005

I'm trying to use 'turnin', but I get an error message saying the command is not found.

You must be logged into csil.cs.ucsb.edu in order to use the `turnin` command.

Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: CSIL, Linux

Wed Mar 30 15:46:17 PST 2005

Why does the academic integrity policy have to be so strict? We learn from each other, and in the real world we'll be collaborating with others all the time.

No policy is going to perfectly encourage learning and perfectly discourage cheating, so any policy is a compromise. For this course, since so much depends on it in upper division courses, I chose a policy that I feel gives everyone the maximal opportunity to learn by doing (rather than by watching) - you make your own mistakes and learn by figuring out (rather than being told) what you did wrong. It's certainly true that in the "real world" you'll be collaborating with others all the time - and, in fact, I think that's also true for most upper-division courses. (I give group assignments all the time in my upper-division and graduate courses.) But learning the basics is a different endeavor than working in the real world. Once you really learn the basics well, then you'll have something very useful to contribute to future collaborative efforts.

Posted by Matthew Turk | Permalink | Categories: CSIL, General

Wed Mar 30 15:42:28 PST 2005

How do I copy my files to my account on a CSIL machine?

You can use the rcp command, or the SSH File Transfer Client (comes with "ssh").

Posted by Matthew Turk | Permalink | Categories: CSIL, General

Wed Mar 30 13:47:06 PST 2005

What if I can't be there for a Wednesday quiz? What if I'm late for class and miss the quiz, or come in during the quiz?

The lowest two quiz scores will be dropped; no other accommodations otherwise.


Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: Class

Wed Mar 30 13:45:21 PST 2005

What if I have problems accessing my account, changing my password, I've gone over my disk quota, etc.?

See the information at http://www.engineering.ucsb.edu/~eci-web/, and/or talk to Roy Washburn in Engr I room 3110.


Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: Class, General

Wed Mar 30 13:42:22 PST 2005

Who do I talk to about the grading of my homework/project/quiz?

Contact the person listed for that assignment on the Grades page.


Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: General

Wed Mar 30 13:41:04 PST 2005

How do I get the lecture notes (or notes/files from the discussion sessions)?

Go to the Schedule page and click on the date of the lecture (or the week of the discussion session).


Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: General

Wed Mar 30 13:39:06 PST 2005

Where is CSIL? When is it open/closed?

CSIL is in Engineering 1, Room 1138.

For more information, see http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/facilities/instructionallabs/index.shtml.


Posted by Ryan Dixon | Permalink | Categories: CSIL